Prevedel lab

Developing advanced optical tools for modern life sciences

Research overview

Fundamental insights in the biological sciences have often been stimulated and catalyzed by the development of new scientific tools, as these are the crucial technologies that drive new experiments and therefore lead to new discoveries. Light microscopy has revolutionized our understanding in many areas of biology, yet light scattering severely limits its performance and biomedical usefulness inside live, three-dimensional tissues, such as the mouse. New approaches and tools are thus required to noninvasively image biological function at depth inside living tissue with sufficient resolution, speed and contrast. The focus of our group at EMBL is to push the frontiers of deep tissue microscopy in terms of imaging depths and resolution by developing advanced and innovative optical imaging techniques. We also actively engage in developing and establishing unconventional imaging approaches such as Brillouin microscopy to ‘image’ mechanical properties of living tissues in a non-contact fashion and with diffraction-limited resolution in 3D.

To do so we draw from diverse fields such as multi-photon microscopy, active wave-front shaping, photo-acoustics, computational imaging as well as high-resolution spectroscopy.

The ultimate goal of our research is the direct application of our newly developed methods to fundamental and previously inaccessible biological questions, with an emphasis on the mouse model. Our multidisciplinary team comprises of physicists, engineers, computer scientists and biologists, and we engage in close collaboration with fellow groups within and outside of EMBL in the fields of cell and developmental biology as well as neuroscience.


Research projects
High-speed bio-imaging

One of our past and current foci is the development of novel optical techniques for high-speed imaging. Together with our collaborators, we apply our methods to study neuronal activity and cellular dynamics in a range of model organisms. Amongst others, we have put forward a two-photon microscopy technique based on light-sculpting (Fig. 1) that has enabled the first whole-brain calcium imaging in C. elegans (Fig. 2). (Schrodel et al., 2013)

Principle and realization of temporal focusing (TeFo)
Fig. 1: Principle and realization of temporal focusing (TeFo).Schematic illustration of temporal focusing setup, illustrating spatial dispersion and pulse width broadening outside the focal (sample) region.
Whole brain imaging in C.Elegans
Fig. 2: Whole brain imaging in C.Elegans.Left: Micrograph of the C. Elegans nematode, brain region is highlighted by red box. Right: Single axial plane acquired with the WF-TeFo method. Dashed lines indicate yz and xz cross-sections shown.

Recently, we extended our light-sculpting imaging methods to the scattering tissue domain and demonstrated fast volumetric calcium imaging across the majority of a cortical column in the mouse (Fig. 3). (Prevedel et al., 2016)

Fast volumetric Ca2+ imaging across a cortical column in the in-vivo mouse
Fig. 3: Fast volumetric Ca2+-imaging across a cortical column in the in-vivo mouse.(a) Cartoon depicting the extend of a cortical column as well as its cortical layers. Red line indicates maximum depth during imaging. (b) Left: 3D rendering of imaged volume (500x500x500µm), individual neurons are clearly resolved. Right: Example Ca2+ signal (∆F/F0) of GCaMP6 fluorescence extracted from the data. Time traces of 16 neurons out of a total of ~4000 are shown. Volume acquisition rate is 3Hz.

In other work, we have established light-field deconvolution microscopy, an elegant approach to perform volumetric imaging that achieves unprecedented acquisition speeds while requiring no mechanical scanning. This can be applied to image neuronal activity across entire, small organisms or small animal brains such as zebrafish larvae (Fig. 4). (Prevedel et al., 2014)

Light-field deconvolution microscopy
Fig. 4: Light-field deconvolution microscopy.Left: Experimental realization depicting the microlens array appended to the camera port of a wide-field microscope. Right: Whole-brain Ca2+ imaging of larval zebrafish in-vivo.

To further push the capabilities of light-field imaging, we have combined selective volume illumination with orthogonal light-field detection to obtain higher and more isotropic resolution, while significantly reducing reconstruction artefacts. With this we were able to image the beating heart of Medaka fish as well as its blood flow dynamics at up to 200Hz volume rate (Fig. 5). (Wagner et al., 2019)

Isotropic light-field microscopy
Fig. 5: Isotropic light-field microscopy.Left: Schematic showing the mutually orthogonal illumination and dual-view detection geometry. Right: Maximum-intensity projections of Medaka heart cells, comparing resolution in standard LFM (top) and dual-view LFM (bottom).
Schrodel T*, Prevedel R*, Aumayr K, Zimmer M, Vaziri A.2013Brain-wide 3D imaging of neuronal activity in Caenorhabditis elegans with sculpted lightNat Methods 10(10): 1013-1020
Prevedel R, Verhoef AJ, Pernia-Andrade AJ, Weisenburger S, Huang BS, Nobauer T, Fernandez A, Delcour JE, Golshani P, Baltuska A, Vaziri A.2016Fast volumetric calcium imaging across multiple cortical layers using sculpted lightNat Meth 13(12): 1021-1028
Prevedel R*, Yoon YG*, Hoffmann M, Pak N, Wetzstein G, Kato S, Schrodel T, Raskar R, Zimmer M, Boyden ES, Vaziri A.2014Simultaneous whole-animal 3D imaging of neuronal activity using light-field microscopyNat Methods 11(7): 727-U161
Wagner N*, Norlin N*, Gierten J, de Medeiros G, Balázs B, Wittbrodt J, Hufnagel L, Prevedel R.2019Instantaneous isotropic volumetric imaging of fast biological processesNat Meth 16, 497–500
Brillouin microscopy

Brillouin microscopy is a novel microscopy technique that measures mechanical properties such as elasticity and viscosity of biological samples in a 3D, nondestructive, and fully optical fashion.

Principle of Brillouin microscopy
Fig. 1: Principle of Brillouin microscopy.Laser light is scattered by thermally generated acoustic waves and undergoes a frequency shift (left). The high shift corresponds to a large longitudinal modulus of the probed volume, which can be interpreted as being ‘stiffer’ (right).

Mechanical properties have been shown to play an important role in several biological processes, including control of malignancy in tumors, stem cells differentiation, as well as in morphogenesis of cells and tissues. Standard techniques in the field of mechanobiology, however, typically rely on external perturbations making them invasive, while other approaches often suffer from poor resolution. Instead Brillouin microscopy exploits a light-matter interaction, called Brillouin scattering, to probe mechanical properties in the GHz regime. Due to its all-optical nature, it can achieve, high, diffraction-limited resolution in 3D. (Bevilacqua et al., 2019)

2D Brillouin map of a cell
Fig. 2: Brillouin imaging of zebrafish tail.Brillouin microscopy is capable of revealing the thin (400 nm) ECM layer and measuring its mechanical properties and thickness in-vivo.

The physical principle is outlined in Figure 1. Laser light is focused on the sample and interacts with sound waves, intrinsically present in any material because of thermal agitation. During the scattering process, the light experiences a positive or negative frequency shift. The amount of the shift is proportional to the speed of sound inside the material and is thus informative of visco-elastic properties. In particular, it is proportional to the longitudinal modulus, from which elastic and viscous parameters can be obtained. (Prevedel et al., 2019)

Our lab has developed a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of fluorescence co-detection for long-term imaging of biological processes. We are applying our Brillouin microscope, in collaboration with other groups, to interesting processes in development and cell biology. Recently we optimized our Brillouin microscope to image the properties of sub-micron thick layers of extracellular layers in live zebrafish (Fig.2). (Bevilacqua et al., 2019)

Prevedel R, Diz-Muñoz A, Ruocco G, Antonacci G.2019Brillouin microscopy: an emerging tool for mechanobiologyNat Meth 16, 969–977
Bevilacqua C*, Sánchez-Iranzo H*, Richter D, Diz-Muñoz A, Prevedel R.2019Imaging mechanical properties of sub-micron ECM in live zebrafish using Brillouin microscopyBiomedical Optics Express 10: 1420-1431
Bevilacqua C, Diz-Muñoz A, Prevedel R.2019Brillouin microscopy - measuring mechanics in biology using lightInFocus magazine - Royal Microscopical Society: issue 53, March 2019
Aberration corrected multi-photon microscopy
in-vivo imaging of dendrites and synapses
Fig. 1: in-vivo imaging of dendrites and synapses.Three-photon microscopy of superficial cortical layers in a Thy1-GFP expressing mouse.
attenuation in brain tissue
Fig. 2: Attenuation in brain tissue.Two optical windows in the near-infrared at 1300nm and 1700nm are optimal for deep tissue imaging. Two photon-microscopy at these windows enables excitation off far-red shifted fluorophores while three-photon excitation enable excitation of common fluorophores such as GFP or RFP. Modified from Horton et al. 2013.

In order to study dynamic biological processes in-vivo in mammalian organisms such as the mouse, techniques are required which enable non-invasive imaging at large tissue depth with sub-cellular resolution. Multi-photon microscopy is currently the technique of choice for in-vivo imaging of opaque and highly scattering tissue samples. However, scattering and optical aberrations lead to degradation of the point spread function (PSF) and hence, reduced image contrast, resolution and excitation power at depth. To enable imaging of cellular- and subcellular structures at high spatial resolution deep inside mammalian tissue in-vivo, we combine two powerful optical techniques: multiphoton microscopy and adaptive optics.

attenuation in brain tissue
Fig. 2: Attenuation in brain tissue.Two optical windows in the near-infrared at 1300nm and 1700nm are optimal for deep tissue imaging. Two photon-microscopy at these windows enables excitation off far-red shifted fluorophores while three-photon excitation enable excitation of common fluorophores such as GFP or RFP. Modified from Horton et al. 2013.
optical aberrations in multi-photon microscopy
Fig. 3: Optical aberrations in multi-photon microscopy.(a) Aberrations stemming from the system and sample lead to wavefront distortions and degradation of the PSF, which in turn lead to a loss of resolution, contrast and signal intensity. However, wavefront aberrations can be corrected by determining an ideal input wavefront which recovers diffraction limited resolution inside the tissue (b).

For deep tissue imaging we are exploiting the advantageous properties of three- photon excitation. The longer wavelength employed for excitation and the later on-set of out-of-focus fluorescence increases the signal-to-noise ratio at depth (Fig.2). This can be combined with red-shifted fluorophores to further reduce scattering. (Qi et al., 2018)

Adaptive optics is a technique to improve imaging performance by correcting wavefront aberrations introduced by the biological sample and the optical system. We are working on direct and indirect wavefront sensing approaches to enable diffraction limited resolution deep inside the tissue (Fig. 3).

We apply our adaptive multi-photon technique to open questions at the forefront of biology and neuroscience.

optical aberrations in multi-photon microscopy
Fig. 3: Optical aberrations in multi-photon microscopy.(a) Aberrations stemming from the system and sample lead to wavefront distortions and degradation of the PSF, which in turn lead to a loss of resolution, contrast and signal intensity. However, wavefront aberrations can be corrected by determining an ideal input wavefront which recovers diffraction limited resolution inside the tissue (b).
Qi J, Sun C, Li D, Zhang H, Yu W, Zebibula A, Lam JWY, Xi W, Zhu L, Cai F, Wei P, Zhu C, Kwok RTK, Streich LL, Prevedel R, Qian J, Tang BZ.2018Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogen with Near-Infrared-II Excitation and Near-Infrared-I Emission for Ultradeep Intravital Two-Photon MicroscopyACS Nano 12(8): 7936-7945
All-optical photoacoustic tomography

The strong scattering properties of many biological tissues prevent deep imaging using visible light. Although approaches exist that partly circumvent this problem, such as multi-photon microscopy or Optical Coherence Tomography, they still hit a hard depth limit at about 1-2 mm in practice. To image beyond, we need to exploit other imaging modalities not based on classical light microscopy. One of the most promising techniques is photoacoustic imaging which allows to achieve imaging depth and resolution similar to that of ultrasound tomography while retaining molecular specificity.

photoacoustic tomography
Fig. 1: Photoacoustic tomography.(A) Physical principles of the photoacoustic effect. (B) Overview of detection and image reconstruction. Curved black line visualises the curvature of the wave being encoded in the time delay of incoming pulses.
photoacoustic tomography of 3dpf zebrafish embryo
Fig. 2: Photoacoustic tomography of 3dpf zebrafish embryo.Right: Bright-field image showing the zebrafish anatomy as well as light-absorbing melanocytes which surround the notochord. Left: Photoacoustic tomography image highlighting melanocytes and eye pigmentation.

In simple terms, the photoacoustic imaging is based on generating sound with the use of light (Fig. 1A). The use of high-energy, short laser pulses tuned to the absorption spectrum of the molecules of interest causes rapid transient heating of the tissue at the sites of light absorption. Rapid heating in turn causes local expansion of the tissue and generates propagating acoustic waves which can be used for ultrasound-based imaging. We are developing approaches based on photoacoustic tomography which allows to fully harvest the deep tissue imaging capabilities (<10mm) of the technique. In this approach, instead of acquiring images pixel by pixel, we excite the entire tissue at once and record the overall generated acoustic field over time from multiple directions. We then use a computational approach based on simulating the acoustic field propagation to reconstruct the absorbing molecule distribution from the acoustic field they generate (Fig. 1B).

photoacoustic tomography of 3dpf zebrafish embryo
Fig. 2: Photoacoustic tomography of 3dpf zebrafish embryo.Right: Bright-field image showing the zebrafish anatomy as well as light-absorbing melanocytes which surround the notochord. Left: Photoacoustic tomography image highlighting melanocytes and eye pigmentation.
Czuchnowski J, Prevedel R.2019Photoacoustics: seeing with sound (pdf) Science in school (Issue 47)
Intravital fluorescence tomography
Working principle of intravital fluorescence tomography
Fig. 1: Working principle of the system.Excitation light (blue) enters the media and was collected by the radially spaced detector array (D1-D6). Photon propagation follows the “banana shape” phenomena. The further the detector located from the source, the deeper the light penetrate into the medium. Subsequently, fluorescence inclusion will be excited by those photons and the emitted light will be collected by detectors. Relative proximity to the fluorescence inclusion will affect the acquired intensity value.

Intravital Fluorescence Tomography (IFT) is a non-invasive, thick tissue imaging technique enabling longitudinal studies. IFT relies on collecting multiply scattered fluorescent light from the surface of a turbid media with a detector array which is radially spaced away from the excitation light source (Fig.1). The different separation between the source and detectors yields depth information of the fluorescence emission inside the tissue. The collected fluorescent light from different detectors constitutes a tomographic data set for 3D volumetric reconstruction of the fluorescent target.

Tumor volume assessment is essential for staging of tumor progression and evaluation of drug treatment efficacy. However, non-invasive assessment of the volume, in-vivo, is still a challenge for traditional imaging modalities, owing to the large interrogation area and deep-seated molecular (fluorescence) signal through a highly scattering skin tissue. Intravital Fluorescence Tomography (IFT) offers a solution to capture the in-vivo tumor volume in 3D with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution with the help of Non-invasive Intravital Imaging Window (NIIW) for tissue stabilization (Fig.2).

Intravital Fluorescence Tomography
Fig. 2: 3D image shows a reconstruction of mCherry expressing tumor cells.Through the fluorescence intensity data acquired by an array of cells, we reconstructed the relative cell density within a 10x10x3 mm3 volume. Colorbar represents the relative cell count within a tumor mass.

With the help of an Doxycycline inducible mammary gland tumor model, one can replicate the tumor lifecycle in mice: the tumor onset, growth, regression, and relapse. IFT provides the platform for long-term tumor monitoring without interfering with the tumor microenvironment and reveals the tumor volume progression over its entire lifecycle. This technique is useful for studying tumor biology, understanding tumor development, and investigating the drug response of a selected tumor type in-vivo in the native tissue. Furthermore, IFT alleviates the burden put on animals, usually during the imaging sessions and reduces the overall required animal number by enabling longitudinal studies. 

Overall, IFT is a powerful 3D intravital imaging tool of biological imaging, which we apply for shedding light on tumor development questions.

Intravital optical coherence imaging

The term optical coherence imaging refers to the optical coherence tomography (OCT) and its another modality optical coherence microscopy (OCM) which has a higher transverse spatial resolution. Similar to ultrasound in principle, OCT/OCM obtains cross sectional images of microstructure in biological systems with optical resolution by measuring the echo time delay of optical backscattering. In general, OCT/OCM allows 3D imaging with fast speed, high resolution and deep penetration. These features make it a powerful intravital imaging tool with applications spanning many multiple clinical specialties as well as fundamental scientific and biological research.

Working principle of OCT
Fig. 1: Working principle of OCTBased on the Wiener-Khintchine Theorem, the depth scan can be calculated by an inverse Fourier-transform from the acquired spectra since the spectral modulation frequency in the space of wavenumber is proportional to the optical pathlength difference.
Volumetric display of mouse skin obtained by OCT
Fig. 2: Volumetric display of mouse skin obtained by OCTA mammary gland (breast) tumor was implanted orthotopically into the mammary fat pad (the black hole at the corner) and kept developing. The total volume of the image is 5x5x0.5(depth) mm.
in-vivo OCT scan of mouse ear
Fig. 3: in-vivo OCT scan of mouse earThis 3D image was acquired by scanning the laser beam on the dorsal side of a mouse ear. The cross sections (B-scan) show the ear structure in a width of 2.5 mm. The thicknesses of mouse ear and its cartilage in the image are around 350 μm and 70 μm respectively.

In our lab, we are developing a high-resolution OCT system for intravital applications such as tumor anatomy imaging (Fig 2).


People
Group members
Robert Prevedel

Robert Prevedel

Group leader

Working on...

Carlo Bevilacqua

Carlo Bevilacqua

PhD student

Working on...

Juan Boffi

Juan Boffi

PostDoc

Working on...

Jakub Czuchnowski

Jakub Czuchnowski

PhD student

Working on...

Sebastian Hambura

Sebastian Hambura

Visiting student

Working on...

Ronja Rehm

Ronja Rehm

Master student

Working on...

Lina Streich

Lina Streich

PhD student

Working on...

Ling Wang

Ling Wang

Research scientist

Working on...

Tristan Wiessalla

Tristan Wiessalla

Master student

Working on...

Associated Postdocs
Senthilkumar Deivasigamani

Senthilkumar Deivasigamani

Shared with Gross group

Working on...

Rachel Templin

Rachel Templin

Shared with Schwab team and Arendt group

Working on...


Alumni
Name Period
Mehmet S. Ozturk 01/17-12/19
Matteo Barbieri 07/19-12/19
Nils Wagner 04/17-09/19
Laura Steffens 05/19-08/19
Momoko Kawarabata 02/19-07/19
Claudia Robens 06/18-08/18
Dongyu Li 05/18-07/18
Kris Krupp 10/17-04/18
Dmitry Richter 09/16-12/17

Open positions
Currently there are opportunities to join our research group as a postdoctoral researcher, PhD student, or Master student.
For more information please visit this site.

Publications
Year 2019
Brillouin microscopy: an emerging tool for mechanobiology
Prevedel R, Diz-Muñoz A, Ruocco G, Antonacci G.
Nat Meth 16, 969–977
Longitudinal monitoring of in-vivo mice mammary tumor progression using intravital fluorescence tomography and optical coherence tomography
Ozturk M S, Wang L, Chaible L M, Jechlinger M, Prevedel R.
Clinical and Preclinical Optical Diagnostics II. Vol. 11073. International Society for Optics and Photonics
Instantaneous isotropic volumetric imaging of fast biological processes
Wagner N*, Norlin N*, Gierten J, de Medeiros G, Balázs B, Wittbrodt J, Hufnagel L, Prevedel R.
Nat Meth 16, 497–500
Imaging mechanical properties of sub-micron ECM in live zebrafish using Brillouin microscopy
Bevilacqua C*, Sánchez-Iranzo H*, Richter D, Diz-Muñoz A, Prevedel R.
Biomedical Optics Express 10: 1420-1431
Year 2018
Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogen with Near-Infrared-II Excitation and Near-Infrared-I Emission for Ultradeep Intravital Two-Photon Microscopy
Qi J, Sun C, Li D, Zhang H, Yu W, Zebibula A, Lam JWY, Xi W, Zhu L, Cai F, Wei P, Zhu C, Kwok RTK, Streich LL, Prevedel R, Qian J, Tang BZ.
ACS Nano 12(8): 7936-7945
Year 2016
Fast volumetric calcium imaging across multiple cortical layers using sculpted light
Prevedel R, Verhoef AJ, Pernia-Andrade AJ, Weisenburger S, Huang BS, Nobauer T, Fernandez A, Delcour JE, Golshani P, Baltuska A, Vaziri A.
Nat Meth 13(12): 1021-1028
Direct detection of a single photon by humans
Tinsley J, Molodtsov M, Prevedel R, Wartmann D, Espigulé-Pons J, Lauwers M, Vaziri A
Nat Commun 7: 12172
Year 2015
Optimizing and extending light-sculpting microscopy for fast functional imaging in neuroscience
Rupprecht P, Prevedel R, Groessl F, Haubensak WE, Vaziri A.
Biomed Opt Express 6(2): 353-368
Year 2014
Simultaneous whole-animal 3D imaging of neuronal activity using light-field microscopy
Prevedel R*, Yoon YG*, Hoffmann M, Pak N, Wetzstein G, Kato S, Schrodel T, Raskar R, Zimmer M, Boyden ES, Vaziri A.
Nat Methods 11(7): 727-U161
Crossed-crystal scheme for femtosecond-pulsed entangled photon generation in periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate
Scheidl T, Tiefenbacher F, Prevedel R, Steinlechner F, Ursin R, Zeilinger A.
Phys Rev A 89(4): 042324
Experimental three-photon quantum nonlocality under strict locality conditions
Erven C, Meyer-Scott E, Fisher K, Lavoie J, Higgins BL, Yan Z, Pugh CJ, Bourgoin JP, Prevedel R, Shalm LK, Richards L, Gigov N, Laflamme R, Weihs G, Jennewein T, Resch KJ.
Nat Photonics 8(4): 292-296
Quantum computing on encrypted data
Fisher KAG, Broadbent A, Shalm LK, Yan Z, Lavoie J, Prevedel R, Jennewein T, Resch KJ.
Nat Commun 5: 3074
Year 2013
Brain-wide 3D imaging of neuronal activity in Caenorhabditis elegans with sculpted light
Schrodel T*, Prevedel R*, Aumayr K, Zimmer M, Vaziri A.
Nat Methods 10(10): 1013-1020
Dispersion-cancelled biological imaging with quantum-inspired interferometry
Mazurek MD, Schreiter KM, Prevedel R, Kaltenbaek R, Resch KJ.
Sci Rep-UK 3: 1582

News
New visiting student joined our lab!
07/01/2020

Sebastian will be working on real time images process and hardware control. Welcome Sebastian!

We are now part of the Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit
19/12/2019

We are now part of the Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit (MMPU) between the University of Heidelberg and EMBL. Together with our colleagues Rohini Kuner and Jan Siemens from the University and Theodore Alexandrov from EMBL we are part of the group “Chronic Pain & Homeostasis” and will contribute with our deep in-vivo brain imaging expertise.

Great news from Brussels!
10/12/2019

The lab has been awarded with an ERC Consolidator grant to fund our work on Brillouin microscopy for the next 5 years. We are all excited and will be looking for new lab members soon.

Lina is at the International Workshop on Adaptive Optics in Industry and Medicine
21/10/2019

On the 24th of October, she will present a talk about her recent progresses in adaptive optics and multi-photon microscopy.

Official website
New Master student joined our lab!
14/10/2019

Tristan, from University of Heidelberg, will be doing his master thesis on analysing facial expressions in mice in relation to motor cortex activity. Welcome Tristan!

Mesoscopic Fluorescence Tomography paper appeared in Biomedical Optics Express
11/10/2019

The paper investigates different Source Detector configurations for mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography. Check it out!

Link to the paper
We are at "Seeing is believing"conference at EMBL!
09/10/2019

Carlo, Jakub and Lina are presenting a poster on the 9th and on the 11th of October.

Official website
Robert at the Interdisciplinary Symposium on 3D Microscopy
01/10/2019

Robert is presenting this week at the Interdisciplinary Symposium on 3D Microscopy in Engelberg, Switzerland, organized by the Swiss Society for Optics and Microscopy

Official website
We are in Porto for the 3rd BioBrillouin meeting
17/09/2019

On Thursday 26th September Carlo is presenting our work on "Imaging mechanical properties of sub-micron ECM in live zebrafish using Brillouin microscopy"

Here you can find more info
We are back from lab retreat
27/08/2019

We have been, togheter with the Diz-Muñoz group, close to the Neckar river. It was a retreat with good scientific talks and discussions and exciting social activities like canoing and geo-cashing. Have a look at the picture before canoing!

Congratulations to Momoko!
10/07/2019

Today Momoko successfully defended her MSc thesis on "Development of a serial time-encoded interferometer for photoacoustic imaging". Well done Momoko!

DFG grant approved
1/07/2019

Happy to announce that we got DFG funding to join SPP 1926 on voltage imaging. Looking forward to working with Paul Heppenstall and the entire consortium

We are at ECBO in Munich
22/06/2019

On Tuesday 25 June Mehmet is presenting "Longitudinal monitoring of in-vivo mice mammary tumor progression using intravital fluorescence tomography and optical coherence tomography"

Here you can find more info
Iso-LFM paper is published in Nature Methods
29/04/2019

Our work on dual-view light-field imaging of fast biological processes appeared online today in Nature Methods. Congrats to everyone involved!
EMBL also published an article and video describing our work. Check it out!

Here you can find a list of all publications
New postdoc to join our lab on neuroimaging
25/03/2019

Juan Boffi joins us as an EIPOD postdoc from the Kuner lab in Heidelberg. Juan will use our fast volumetric microscopes to study sensory processing in the mouse brain. Welcome Juan!

Jakub is at EMIM in Glasgow
19/03/2019

Tomorrow at 16:00 he is presenting a poster "Longitudinal studies of mouse mammary gland tumour models using photoacoustics"

Here you can find more info
We are online!
08/03/2019

Today our website is online!


Twitter
Below you can find our timeline on Twitter.
If you like it, please
on Twitter!

Contact
Prevedel lab

European Molecular Biology Lab

Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit
Developmental Biology Unit
Epigenetics and Neurobiology Unit

Meyerhofstraße 1
69117 Heidelberg
Germany

Room 407
+49 6221 387 8722
prevedel(at)embl.de

EMBL group website